Lawyer Wellness: Resolve to find 6 minutes for yourself.

My father used to joke that he’d hold back on calling a lawyer until he had enough to talk about for 6 minutes.  Because he knew that’s how much he’d be charged simply for making the call.

Those days are gone.

Now he waits until he has enough material to send his lawyer a really long e-mail.

Anyhow, here’s something else that lawyers can do in 6-minute increments: invest in their own wellness.

Wellness

Last August, the the National Task Force On Lawyer Well-Being released its report The Path to Lawyer Well-Being: Practical Recommendations for Positive Change.  The report puts the issue of lawyer well-being on the front burner in each of our kitchens.

And it turns up the heat.

Here’s an excerpt from the Task Force’s introductory note:

  • “To be a good lawyer, one has to be a healthy lawyer.  Sadly, our profession is falling short when it comes to well-being.  The two studies referenced above reveal that too many lawyers and law students experience chronic stress and high rates of depression and substance abuse.  These findings are incompatible with a sustainable legal profession, and they raise troubling implications for many lawyers’ basic competence.” (emphasis added).

The report includes recommendations for various stakeholder groups connected to the profession.  My blog post on the Task Force’s recommendations is here.

Last week, and in response to the report, the Vermont Supreme Court created the Vermont Commission on the Well-Being of the Legal Profession.  The Commission’s first meeting is later this month.  The Commission includes a representative from each of the stakeholder groups identified in the Task Force’s report.  Each representative will lead a sub-committee charged with reviewing the recommendations targeted at that stakeholder group.  The Commission will be formally introduced at a plenary session during the Vermont Bar Association’s Midyear Meeting in March.

I expect that you’ll hear a lot about the Commission, its work, and lawyer wellness throughout 2018.

In the meantime, don’t forget that lawyer wellness isn’t all about rehab or treatment. It also includes things like work-life balance and mindfulness.

Jeena Cho is legal mindfulness strategist.  She’s a leading voice on lawyer wellness.  She’s a great Twitter follow and writes often for the ABA Journal.

One of Jeena’s sayings sticks with me.  As I referenced in my post recommending that lawyers Make Time For What Matters, Jeena tells us:

“Finally, remember: ‘Secure your own oxygen mask before assisting others.’ ”

It’s great advice.  We can’t help others (our clients) if we haven’t already helped ourselves.

And it’s easier than you might think.

Jeena authored an article that appears in the January 2018 issue of the ABA Journal: Starting small: it’s time to make an achievable well-being resolution.  As she points out, even only 6 minutes per day can help to improve well-being.

Maybe mediation isn’t your thing.  Maybe it’s running, or reading, or playing an instrument, or cross-country skiing, or doing puzzles, or cooking, or crafts, or coaching, or hiking, or . . . whatever.  Something other than work!

Whatever it is, in 2018, resolve to find a few minutes a day to focus on your own well-being.

 

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