Pro Bono? There’s an App for that!

Well, not really an app.

So, in 2016, the ABA released a Report on the Future of Legal Services in the United StatesI don’t think the report received enough attention, but that’s a blog for another day.

Today’s point is limited to a theme expressed in the report.  It’s a theme that the ABA’s Ellyn Rosen stressed in a seminar that I attended two days ago: technology can help to close the access gap.

Ellyn cited to an eye-opening finding in the report. It’s on page 14, and quotes this 2014 article by Gillian Hadfield.

  • “Even with the profession’s deep commitment to pro bono and further innovations, pro bono work alone will not resolve the tremendous need for civil legal representation. Data shows that annually ‘U.S. lawyers would have to increase their pro bono efforts … to over nine hundred hours each to provide some measure of assistance to all households with legal needs.’ ”

Here’s one way to help: Vermont Free Legal Answers.  Think of it as pro bono without ever having to leave your desk.  All you have to do is sign up, then pick & choose the questions you want to answer.  It’s that simple.  If you’re reading this and are licensed in a jurisdiction other than Vermont, odds are that your state has it too. Over 40 states have adopted the ABA’s free legal answers model.

Am I asking you to increase your hours to 900? I am not.  I’m simply reminding you that every little bit helps. Think of the starfish story:

One day a man was walking along the beach when he noticed
a boy picking something up and gently throwing it into the ocean.

Approaching the boy, he asked, “What are you doing?”

The youth replied, “Throwing starfish back into the ocean.
The surf is up and the tide is going out.  If I don’t throw them back, they’ll die.”

“Son, the man said, “don’t you realize there are miles and miles of beach and hundreds of starfish?
You can’t make a difference!”

After listening politely, the boy bent down, picked up another starfish,
and threw it back into the surf.  Then, smiling at the man, he said
“I made a difference for that one.”

When it comes to unmet legal needs and pro bono, you too can make a difference for that one.

See the source image